The Eastbank Killer: Chapter Four

The Eastbank Killer – A Serial Novella Attorney Donna Bosque finds her life turned upside down when an attractive associate at her firm becomes convinced the Eastbank Killer, who has been terrifying Portland, is directly linked to their law firm. Start from the beginning Previous Chapter Chapter Four “Hello?” Donna called into the hallway of […]

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A PROPERLY DIRTY DRESS

When people say they want to get married, I cringe. When people say they are against marriage, I cringe, too. The simple answer to my ambivalence towards traditional coupledom is: I lost my mother to alcoholism early on and saw her for the last time when I was only eleven years old. The original dyad; the […]

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Dear Maytag

Dear Maytag, It was the summer of 1996. I was twelve. It was a good year. My summers were unending, my parents had regular poker night at their house on Sundays where they filled the main area with cigarette smoke, and I was just starting to shave my legs. I had dyed purple streaks into my […]

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Don’t Blame the Slaves

Some days, your Facebook and Twitter feeds are full of viral cat videos. Other days, a New York Times op-ed makes the rounds. The latest of the latter made me wish it was a Grumpy Cat kind of day. Tim Kreider’s piece, link-bait titled “Slaves of the Internet, Unite!” took the creative community to task […]

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The Biggest Scar

Background: I have been trying to figure out how to live as a parent/partner/woman who is always in remission. I have had multiple surgeries from my thyroid cancer, crohns disease and general over ability to produce tissue and tumors.  * One of the most noticeable scars runs hip to hip. It’s not straight, though if […]

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Mind Your Own Business

When Multnomah County Commissioner Jeff Cogen’s two-year relationship with Sonia Manhas became publicly known recently, it was astonishing to see the public immediately go on a vicious attack. Cogen, a once respected politician who had served Portland’s community of low-income and under-served populations had been attacked and called all manner of horrible names on various Internet chat rooms, falling from grace to become the […]

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Painting Faces in PDX

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Decorative flora at Michael Costello. Photo by Leah Haas

Makeup artists have a special perspective at fashion shows: they are commissioned to produce the vision of the stylist and designer, but (other than the key artist) typically aren’t allowed input to influence a certain look. They play an intimate role in the production of the show while having the ability to maintain perspective of the fashion at hand. With the conclusion of two of Portland’s major fashion events this fall—Portland Fashion Week and FASHIONxt—I picked the brains of two makeup artists who worked these shows on where they think we are and where we might be headed in Portland fashion.

Madeline Roosevelt worked behind the scenes on the final night of Portland Fashion Week painting faces. When asked to compare this year to seasons past, she described the show as much more organized. “Everything was charted out,” she said, and models would move through a kind of conveyor belt of makeup styling, with each artist focusing on skin, eyes or lips. Madeline was in charge of the face, making sure foundation, highlights and contour were perfect. One look was simple and fresh, one featured a nude lip and smoky eye and another was gaunt and avant-garde.

When comparing Portland to the greater fashion world, Madeline notes that that there is a lot of talent in Portland, but some artists don’t know how to execute their visions well. In Portland, Roosevelt feels like there are some good ideas, but the quality is off.

“You see photos and think ‘that’s a great piece,’ but really the photo doesn’t give it justice.” She has found that up close it’s easy to see that the piece could be better. When asked what could be done in Portland to produce better work, she said that people could try harder and do more research.

“It is a combination of things,” Madeline said. “Maybe it’s the model. Or the having the eye. I see a beautiful piece but the outfit does not go with the person wearing it. Sometimes it doesn’t display well.” When the pieces do work, however, the result is well worth the trip.

Models in waiting at Michalle Costello, Portland Fashion Week. Photo by Leah Haas
Models in waiting at Michalle Costello. Photo by Leah Haas

Raphael Ocasio also worked Portland Fashion Week as makeup artist and FASHIONxt as assistant to the key makeup artist Jamie O’Neill, owner of Portland-based makeup company Skull Sugar. He was in charge of eyes and brows and had the final look at models at FASHIONxt. Raphael thrived off the full-throttle atmosphere of the shows and has an optimistic view of where Portland fashion is headed.

“Some of the shows at Portland Fashion Week really gave me hope,” he said, adding that he feels there is better awareness about fashion here and more outlets for people to showcase their work. He appreciated the “hippie couture” looks at Portland Fashion Week and feels like some of these shows actually influence how women in Portland dress.

The fluffy, flowing looks at Michael Costello were a hit. Raphael found Costello to be one of his favorites, along with Seth Aaron and Hello Eliza—a pop-art line by Eliza Harrison that volleys from metallic miniskirts to sheer neon to studded platform shoes paired with spandex polka dots.

“The crowd response to Hello Eliza…I was floored,” Raphael said. “How she executed this show, with the lime green bangs, the Lil Kim hair colors, big gaudy chains, the tiger fur…the girl is tripping out!” This kind of energetic show bucks the eerily familiar feel that so many designers can fall in to.

“Women in Portland are picking up fashion faster [than men]” Raphael said. He feels that men here are comfortable, and a little afraid of change–a criticism easily leveled against Portland fashion as a whole just a few short years ago. Like many women here, the new Portland fashion is more confident, more colorful and more excited about self expression.

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No, Stop.

He says you are a “hot chick” just like the others. “Just think of it more like–you go girl,” a female boss says when you finally complain. You think: you wouldn’t have taken the job to be hot. A year later, you hear a woman say she has never been employed without harassment. You know […]

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